Primary Hyperparathyroidism

Q) Which is not a feature of primary hyperthyroidism?

a) Increase Parathormone

b) Increase Calcium

c) Decreased phosphate

d) Dystrophic calcification

Ans d 

Clinical features of Hyperparathyroidism are

  1. Subperiosteal bone erosions
  2. Primary Hyperthyroidism  is defined as hypercalcaemia in the presence of an unsuppressed and therefore relatively, or absolutely, elevated PTH level. Elevated calcium and elevated PTH are important  in diagnosis of PTH
  3. The presence of kidney stones remains the most common clinical manifestation of symptomatic PHPT.
  4. It is associated with a low serum phosphate in the setting of normal creatinine and vitamin D levels

Ref Bailey and Love Page 826

 Some useful questions can be bought here  MCQs and EMQs in Surgery: A Bailey & Love Revision Guide, Second Edition 

Some uncommon disorders associated with hyperparathyroidism include

peptic ulcers, pancreatitis, and bone disease

central nervous system symptoms 


Causes of Primary Hyperparathyroidism are

  1. Parathyroid Adenoma -75% (can be localised by Sestamibi scanning)

Management of primary hyperparathyroidism

Patients with symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism as manifested by kidney stones, renal dysfunction, or osteoporosis should undergo parathyroidectomy.

If the patient is asymptomatic and detected to have high parathyroid levels then surgery is done only if

  1. age is less than 50
  2. very high excretion of calcium in urine
  3. low creatinine clearance
  4. kidney stones
  5. high serum calcium

 

Duodenal adenoma in FAP

Q) Surgery in FAP patient after colectomy for ampullary adenoma Stage IV
a)Classic Whipple
b) Pancreas preserving duodenectomy
c) Transduodenal excision
d) endoscopic excision


Answer is free for all

b) 

Duodenal cancers are the third most common (10%) cause of death in FAP after CRC and desmoid disease.

Duodenal adenomas  100% incidence

 tendency to progress to cancer.

The severity of duodenal adenomatosis predicts the chances of duodenal cancer,  Spigelman staging system that is based on

adenoma number, size, and histology

Patients with stage 0 disease (no adenomas) can be surveyed again in 5 years.

Stage I patients can be surveyed in 3 years;

stage II in 1 year;

stage III in 6 months

and stage IV is an indication to consider surgery. 36 % progress to cancer- Surgery is pancreas preserving duodenectomy

A Whipple is indicated for a duodenal cancer that is definitively operable

Duodenal adenomas can be treated by snare polypectomy or by transduodenal polypectomy. Ampullary adenomas can be treated by endoscopic mucosal resection or surgical ampullectomy

Ref schakelford page 1968

Radical Cholecystectomy

 Q) Radical cholecystectomy includes all except

a) Segment IVb and Va

b) 2cm wedge resection

c) Rt Extended Hepatectomy

d) Paraaortic lymphnodes

Answer and Explanation here

History of Radical Cholecystectomy

  1. Early 20th century removal of gall bladder and wedge of liver ( No lymphadenectomy) 
  2. In 1954, Glenn et al - radical resection procedure with intended regional lymphadenectomy (portal lymph node dissection), designated as “radical cholecystectomy” (Glenn operation)
  3.  Fahim et al in 1962 advocated radical resection consisting of hepatectomy and portal lymph node dissection

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